Intersecting Methods 2018 Profile: Megan Parker

This is the second post in a series to introduce the participating printmakers and their collaborators for the 2018 edition of the Intersecting Methods Portfolio. Every two weeks, into mid-December, a new profile of a collaborative pair will be posted. This segment profiles Megan Parker, artist,  and her collaborator, Dr. Justin Havird, postdoctoral research at Colorado State University. 

 

 

Megan Parker

Megan grew up pursuing art in the mountains of North Carolina. After studying at Yeditepe Üniversitesi in Turkey and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, she earned her BFA with a concentration in design in 2008. She currently lives in Fort Collins and is a member of the printmaking co-op Mad Deer Press. Megan enjoys making narrative prints inspired by Appalachian folklore, Medieval art, and good ol’ fashioned animal skulls.

Website: http://meganlparker.com/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/themeganparker/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/themeganlparker

Here are three examples of Megan’s printmaking work.

 

 

 

Dr Justin Havird

I am a broadly trained evolutionary biologist interested in how the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes work together to maintain cellular function in eukaryotes. I am currently a post-doc working with Daniel Sloan at Colorado State University investigating evolutionary genomics and cytonuclear interactions. This work has included examining patterns of coevolution between mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and investigating how mitochondrial mutation rate influences these processes. The plant genus Silene has been a model system for much of this work, as mitochondrial mutation rates vary drastically among closely related Silene species.

I completed my PhD at Auburn University, working with Scott Santos in the Molette Biology Laboratory for Environmental and Climate Change Studies. For my PhD I utilized animals from anchialine habitats across the Pacific to address broad topics such as the evolution of molecular mechanisms of osmoregulation.

Molecular techniques including next-generation sequencing and development of bioinformatic pipelines are used in most of my research projects. 

Look for the next profile in two weeks. In the meantime, R&D editions will have its regular bi-weekly updates on studio work in between the profiles.

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