Vacation Post #2: Bathgate Update

Today’s post is coming on the end of the second vacation for the summer, but it will have more posted than the last vacation post. We are getting very close to production time for the Chris Bathgate edition. Chris and I have decided upon paper for the edition, we have the plates ready and will be creating them for sale as individuals and as a suite of prints.

Most recently we tested the idea of chine colle for a kitakata paper print backed by Rives BFK paper from Arches. For those who do not know what chine colle is, it is a french term for the process of adhering a sheet of paper to another while it is being printed. For the process, I dampened a sheet of Rives BFK in a water bath, spritz a sheet of kitakata cut down to the same size as the copper plate and then sprinkled the back of the kitakata with the methyl cellulose powder. I then placed the kitakata paper faced down on the copper plate and laid a sheet of Rives BFK on top, the pressure of the press transferred the ink to the kitakata while at the same time adhering the two sheets together with the moisture of the BFK paper and pressure from the press.

Kitakata paper and shaker with methyl cellulose

Kitakata paper and shaker with methyl cellulose

Close up on methyl cellulose on kitakata

Close up on methyl cellulose on kitakata

Test proof of Kitakata Chine Colle on Rives BFK

Test proof of Kitakata Chine Colle on Rives BFK

Chine colle is a beautiful technique that can greatly enhance a print when done with the right type/color of paper. But in this case, Chris and I felt there was no real strong reason to use the technique and that a straight white paper would be best for the final editions. So I went about tearing down 16 sheets of Rives BFK paper this past week.

Setup for tearing down the paper.

Setup for tearing down the paper.

Final stack of 144 sheets of Rives BFK with some extra strips.

Final stack of 144 sheets of Rives BFK with some extra strips.

In total, I made roughly 200 tears for the 144 sheets of paper for printing. Now, there will not be 144 prints in the end, all printmakers tear down more sheets than their intended final edition because of loss from multiple factors, including poor wiping, low ink slab, etc. Each print will start of with 48 sheets for printing and the final edition count will be determined once printing and curation is completed. Check in the next few weeks for tips on printing large editions like this one.

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