Intersecting Methods 2018 Profile: Elizabeth Klimek

This is the seventh post in a series to introduce the participating printmakers and their collaborators for the 2018 edition of the Intersecting Methods Portfolio. Every two weeks, into mid-December, a new profile of a collaborative pair will be posted. This segment profiles Elizabeth Klimek, and her collaborator, Mary Ann Stuck

 

Elizabeth Klimek

Elizabeth Klimek (elizabethklimek.com) is an independent artist and teaches remotely for the College of Southern Nevada in Las Vegas. She is of Seneca (Cornplanter) decent, but holds no tribal affiliations. She received her BFA from West Virginia University and her MFA from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Klimek is a working artist living in Gaithersburg, MD, who shows her work nationally and internationally. Her most recent group exhibitions include: 2017 National Alternative Processes Competition, Soho Photo Gallery, New York, NY, then 3rd Annual Hand Pulled Prints: The Current Practice in Printmaking, Site:Brooklyn, Brooklyn, NY, Spectrum National Juried Printmaking Show, NEXT Print Biennial 2017, Nicole Longnecker Gallery, Houston, TX, 2017 Atlant Print Biennial, Kai Lin Art, Atlanta, GA, 2017 Delta National Small Prints Exhibition, Bradbury Art Museum, Arkansas State University, Jonesboro, AR , Parkside National Small Print Exhibition, Fine Arts Gallery, University of Wisconsin-Parkside, WI, Printwork 2016, Artist Image Resources, Pittsburgh, PA,, Beyond the Norm: International Juried Print Exhibition, University of Illinois, juror: Susan Tallman, CNTRL+P: Printmaking in the 21st Century by University of Tennessee Alumni, Ewing Gallery of Art, Knoxville, TN, Power of the Press, Coburn Gallery, Ashland University, Ashland, OH. She is the organizer of the Dog Head Stew Portfolios, which have been exhibited around the world, and recently purchased by the Library of Congress in Washington DC.

Here are some examples of Elizabeth’s printmaking work.

 

Mary Ann Stuck

Mary Ann Stuck has been part of the health care profession for over 50 years.  She received her nursing degree from the Washington School of Nursing in 1962, and worked in several hospitals over the years.  She participated in the Nurses’ Health Study at Harvard University from its beginnings in 1976, until 2008.  She was a care giver to her mother, Mary Kania for 20 years during her battle with dementia.  Now a dementia patient herself, she is still proud of her nursing career and still takes care of her family with pride.  She is the mother of Elizabeth Klimek.

Look for the next profile in two weeks. In the meantime, R&D editions will have its regular bi-weekly updates on studio work in between the profiles.

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Intersecting Methods 2018 Profile: Jackson Taylor

This is the sixth post in a series to introduce the participating printmakers and their collaborators for the 2018 edition of the Intersecting Methods Portfolio. Every two weeks, into mid-December, a new profile of a collaborative pair will be posted. This segment profiles Jackson Taylor, Teaching Assistant at the University of Louisville, and his collaborator, Mark Hardin, Director of Fisheries at the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife

 

Jackson Taylor

Jackson Taylor is a print artist. living and working in Louisville, Kentucky.  Taylor has participated in several national portfolio exchanges (such as David Spencer-Pierce’s Retelling Project), as well as a handful of juried printmaking exhibitions.  He is currently the Teaching Assistant to the University of Louisville’s print faculty, Rachel Singel.

He specializes in lithographic and silkscreen printing techniques, and concerns himself with establishing non-linear storytelling via an intense layering of printed material.  As layers of ink are applied, a new skin develops that replaces the original texture of the paper.  This new skin is then populated by images of warplanes, discarded toys, and biomorphic inspired drawings.  The works come together to present a collage (or gathering) of printed information that convey kaleidoscopic narratives that deal with ideas of transition, memory, and certain mortality.

Here are some examples of Jackson’s printmaking work.

 

 

Mark Hardin, Director of Fisheries at the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife

Mike Hardin’s career has focused on minimizing human impact on natural ecosystems.  The work has taken Mike  into caves in search of endangered species of bats, to wetlands along the Green River floodplains.  In the last 13 years Hardin’s work has centered around restoring habitat in degraded streams across Kentucky.  The work pulls together biologists, geomorphologists, and engineers to develop designs that can be implemented to restore self-sustaining streams as well as identify and preserve rare, high quality streams.  The projects have been implemented on trout streams, headwaters, and scenic gorges.  Most recently, his team completed a mile long project creating a trout stream below Wolf Creek Dam in southern Kentucky, the Hatchery Creek Project.  Water exiting a fish hatchery below Wolf Creek Dam had eroded a deep gully spilling sediment pollution into the Cumberland River.  The project created a new path for the water down a mile long stream with gentle meanders, riffles and pools, and a steep step pool-boulder drop to the Cumberland River.  The project incorporated habitat specific rocks to allow trout from the Cumberland River to migrate upstream  to spawn in the newly created Hatchery creek.

Look for the next profile in two weeks. In the meantime, R&D editions will have its regular bi-weekly updates on studio work in between the profiles.

Intersecting Methods 2018 Profile: Beth Grabowski

This is the fifth post in a series to introduce the participating printmakers and their collaborators for the 2018 edition of the Intersecting Methods Portfolio. Every two weeks, into mid-December, a new profile of a collaborative pair will be posted. This segment profiles Beth Grabowski, Professor of Art at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,  and her collaborator, Bob Goldstein, James L. Peacock III Distinguished Professor in the Biology Department at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. 

 

Beth Grabowski

Beth Grabowski is an artist, author and educator. She earned her MFA in printmaking from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1985. Grabowski is Professor of Art at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she teaches all manner of printmaking, book arts and a Master’s course in studio pedagogy. She has been actively involved with SGC International, a non-profit educational organization for print, paper and book artists, educators, collectors, and enthusiasts, serving as its president from 2012-14.

Grabowski is co-author, with Bill Fick (Duke University), of Printmaking, a Complete Guide to Materials and Processes, (Laurence King, 2009, 2nd edition 2014). The book has been released in two English editions (American and British), Spanish, French, German, Polish, and Chinese. Grabowski is the recipient of three North Carolina Arts Council awards and has been the beneficiary of several artist residencies including those at), Sanbao Ceramics Institute (China), Frans Masereel Centrum (Belgium), Tom Blaess Atelier (Switzerland), and most recently at Proyecto ‘Ace (Argentina).

Other professional activities include curating an international portfolio honoring Käthe Kollwitz, which debuted at the Kollwitz Museum-Berlin in September 2005, and co-organizing Visualizing Human Rights conferences at UNC-Chapel Hill in 2008, 2010 and 2011 and 2012. Grabowski’s work has been shown widely and is included in numerous public and private collections, including the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington DC and the Bibliotheque Nationale de France, Paris.

Here are some examples of Beth’s printmaking work.

 

 

 

Bob Goldstein, James L. Peacock III Distinguished Professor

Bob Goldstein received his Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin in 1992. He did postdoctoral research at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England and was a Miller Institute Research Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley. In 1999, he joined the faculty of the Biology Department at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he is now the James L. Peacock III Distinguished Professor. His research group combines old methods of microscopy and hand-manipulations of cells with a variety of modern methods, to make discoveries that contribute to revealing how cells function during development. His group is also developing a little-studied microscopic animal—water bears—as a useful model system for understanding how mechanisms in cell and developmental biology evolve, and how biological materials can survive extremes. Goldstein currently serves on the Council of the American Society for Cell Biology. He received a Pew Scholars Award in 2000 and was named a Guggenheim Fellow in 2007.

Look for the next profile in two weeks. In the meantime, R&D editions will have its regular bi-weekly updates on studio work in between the profiles.

Intersecting Methods 2018 Profile: Mariana Smith

This is the fourth post in a series to introduce the participating printmakers and their collaborators for the 2018 edition of the Intersecting Methods Portfolio. Every two weeks, into mid-December, a new profile of a collaborative pair will be posted. This segment profiles Mariana Smith, Assistant Professor at Stockton University,  and her collaborator, Anna Pfeiffer-Herbert, Assistant Professor of Marine Science at Stockton University. 

 

Mariana Smith

Mariana Smith is an Assistant Professor at the Stockton University, NJ. In her studio Mariana Smith combines printmaking, miniature painting, and video installations.

Mariana Smith received a BFA in fine art and miniature painting from Moscow College of Applied and Industrial Arts in Moscow, Russia. After immigrating to USA in 1992, she received a 2002 BFA with emphasis in printmaking from the Columbus College of Art and Design in Columbus OH, and a 2004 MFA from the Cornell University in Ithaca, NY.

Smith’s work has been exhibited in USA, Italy, China, Ireland, New Zealand, Guam and Armenia, and was displayed at the State of Ohio Governor’s Mansion in Columbus, Ohio. Artist residencies include International printmaking workshop in Auckland, New Zealand; Scuola Internazionale di Grafica di Venezia, Venice, Italy, residency; International Printmaking Workshop, Xi’an, China; GCAC Dresden Residency, Dresden, Germany; Venice Printmaking Studio, Venice, Italy; Vermont Studio Center; Moscow College of Applied and Industrial Arts, and Fedoskino Lacquer Miniature Factory, in Russia.

Currently, she is collaborating with the multimedia artists and scholars from USA, Armenia, Germany, and Greece on a project titled “Metamorphosis – The Human Stories.” It is a series of international exhibitions and lectures connecting contemporary art and the global migrant and refugee crisis.

Here are some examples of Mariana’s printmaking work.

 

Anna Pfeiffer-Herbert

Anna Pfeiffer-Herbert is an oceanographer interested in interactions of physical and ecological processes in the coastal ocean and estuaries. Anna holds a Ph.D. in Oceanography from University of Rhode Island, an M.S. in Ocean Sciences from University of California, Santa Cruz, and a B.A. in Biology from Carleton College. Currently, Anna is an Assistant Professor of Marine Science in the School of Natural Science and Mathematics at Stockton University in Southern New Jersey. Her recent projects include physical influences on oysters in the Mullica River-Great Bay estuary, biogeochemical fluxes in the Columbia River plume, and wind-driven estuary-shelf exchange and larval ingress in the Narragansett Bay estuary.

Look for the next profile in two weeks. In the meantime, R&D editions will have its regular bi-weekly updates on studio work in between the profiles.

Intersecting Methods 2018 Profile: Sarah Fukami

This is the third post in a series to introduce the participating printmakers and their collaborators for the 2018 edition of the Intersecting Methods Portfolio. Every two weeks, into mid-December, a new profile of a collaborative pair will be posted. This segment profiles Sarah Fukami, artist,  and her collaborator, Christine Fukami. 

 

 

Sarah Fukami

Sarah Fukami was born and works in Denver, Colorado. She received her BFA with distinction from the University of Denver, and is currently finishing a two-year residency at RedLine. Specializing in mixed media printmaking, her work ranges from traditional techniques to straddling the line between the two- and three-dimensional utilizing materials such as Plexiglas. Her work focuses on the development and evolution of identity, particularly in relation to the immigrant experience. Her Japanese family was interned during World War II, and her art is rooted in social justice. More recently, she has become interested in the dissemination of history by searching through national archives and investigating unknown individuals from records and photographs.

instagram: @sarahfukami.art

Here are three examples of Sarah’s printmaking work.

 

 

Christine Fukami

Christine Fukami was born and raised in Denver, CO.  She attended the University of Denver, where she received her ACS BS with distinction in Chemistry.  She also graduated with an MS in Chemistry from Colorado State University, where she majored in Analytical Chemistry.  The majority of her research has revolved around identifying contaminants and studying their behavior in the environment with the aim of creating awareness of what is being introduced and to begin the arduous task of reducing their presence.  More recently, Christine has become interested in using microfluidic platforms for in vivo studies of cancer metastasis in order to improve understanding, and therefore treatment options for those afflicted by the disease.

Look for the next profile in two weeks. In the meantime, R&D editions will have its regular bi-weekly updates on studio work in between the profiles.

Intersecting Methods 2018 Profile: Megan Parker

This is the second post in a series to introduce the participating printmakers and their collaborators for the 2018 edition of the Intersecting Methods Portfolio. Every two weeks, into mid-December, a new profile of a collaborative pair will be posted. This segment profiles Megan Parker, artist,  and her collaborator, Dr. Justin Havird, postdoctoral research at Colorado State University. 

 

 

Megan Parker

Megan grew up pursuing art in the mountains of North Carolina. After studying at Yeditepe Üniversitesi in Turkey and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, she earned her BFA with a concentration in design in 2008. She currently lives in Fort Collins and is a member of the printmaking co-op Mad Deer Press. Megan enjoys making narrative prints inspired by Appalachian folklore, Medieval art, and good ol’ fashioned animal skulls.

Website: http://meganlparker.com/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/themeganparker/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/themeganlparker

Here are three examples of Megan’s printmaking work.

 

 

 

Dr Justin Havird

I am a broadly trained evolutionary biologist interested in how the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes work together to maintain cellular function in eukaryotes. I am currently a post-doc working with Daniel Sloan at Colorado State University investigating evolutionary genomics and cytonuclear interactions. This work has included examining patterns of coevolution between mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and investigating how mitochondrial mutation rate influences these processes. The plant genus Silene has been a model system for much of this work, as mitochondrial mutation rates vary drastically among closely related Silene species.

I completed my PhD at Auburn University, working with Scott Santos in the Molette Biology Laboratory for Environmental and Climate Change Studies. For my PhD I utilized animals from anchialine habitats across the Pacific to address broad topics such as the evolution of molecular mechanisms of osmoregulation.

Molecular techniques including next-generation sequencing and development of bioinformatic pipelines are used in most of my research projects. 

Look for the next profile in two weeks. In the meantime, R&D editions will have its regular bi-weekly updates on studio work in between the profiles.

Intersecting Methods 2018 Profile: Taryn McMahon

This is the first post in a series to introduce the participating printmakers and their collaborators for the 2018 edition of the Intersecting Methods Portfolio. Every two weeks, into mid-December, a new profile of a collaborative pair will be posted. This segment profiles Taryn McMahon, Assistant Professor in the School of Art at Kent State University, and her collaborator, Kathryn Strand, Assistant Professor in the College of Architecture and Environmental Design at Kent State University. 

 

Taryn McMahon

Taryn McMahon’s work imagines a future ecology in which the natural and artificial become intertwined and conflated. She has received numerous awards for her work including the Southern Graphics Council International Graduate Fellowship and fully funded residencies at Anderson Ranch, Snowmass Village, CO; Anchor Graphics, Chicago, IL; Women’s Studio Workshop, Rosendale, NY; and 55 Limited, Berlin, Germany. She has had solo exhibitions at The Print Center, Philadelphia, PA; Lexington Art League, Lexington, KY; and William Busta Gallery, Cleveland, OH. Group exhibitions include the Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville, FL; Dishman Art Museum, Beaumont, TX; McDonough Museum of Art, Youngstown, OH; and Islensk Grafik, Reykjavik, Iceland, among many others. Her prints are in the collections of Art in Embassies Program, Collection of the US Embassy, Reykjavik, Iceland; Anchor Graphics, Chicago, IL; University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; and Women’s Studio Workshop, Rosendale, NY. She received her MFA from the University of Iowa and is an Assistant Professor at Kent State University.

Here are three examples of Taryn’s printmaking work.

 

Kathryn Strand

Kathryn Strand’s research-based practice with husband Jason Turnidge is focused on the choreography of architectural environments through fabrication of material and virtual situation. Interests include the examination of traditional to contemporary methods of architectural representation as generative tools that mediate between individual idea and constructed environment. The work has been recognized with numerous local to international awards and related research has been presented and published both nationally and internationally.

Additional professional experience includes work as a design associate at Thom Stauffer Architect[s] in Kent, OH where she was a design team member on numerous award-winning projects, including the Ceruti Residence, which received a House of the Year Award in 2006 from Architecture Magazine.

Strand received a Bachelor of Science degree in Fine Arts and Art History from the University of Wisconsin Madison. In 2002, she received a Master of Architecture degree from University of Pennsylvania where she spent a semester studying at the Architecture Association in London and was a participant in the International Laboratory of Architecture and Environmental Design held in Venice, Italy.

Strand is an Associate Professor in the College of Architecture and Environmental Design at Kent State University where she coordinates the First Year Foundation Sequence and conducts undergraduate design studios, architectural history, and a theory seminar on media and representation.

Look for the next profile in two weeks. In the meantime, R&D editions will have its regular bi-weekly updates on studio work in between the profiles.

Intersecting Methods 2018 Participants

Today I can announce the participants chosen for the 2018 installment of the Intersecting Methods portfolio. I have selected a great group of printmakers for the next set of editions. Here is the list of the final selections.

Sarah Fukami

David Gerhard

Beth Grabowski

Steve Huey

Sarah Marshall

Taryn McMahon

Howard Paine

Megan Parker

Marzi Rahmani

Megan Singelton

Mariana Smith

Jackson Taylor

 

I am really excited for this group of participants and look forward to posting profiles of each participant and their collaborator in a new series over the summer and into the fall. Starting on July 14, every two weeks (in between my regular posts) I will be putting together a profile of each duo with biographies and images ending mid-December.

 

One Month Out!

The deadline for the Intersecting Methods 2018 portfolio is May 1st!

We are just under one month, so make sure to get your applications in.

Here is the link to the flyer once more:

https://rndeditions.files.wordpress.com/2017/02/2018submissionflyer.pdf

Intersecting Methods 2018 Call!

With the success of the two previous iterations of the Intersecting Methods portfolio, R&D editions is putting out the call for new participants to find collaborators and make editions that will be exhibited and build an archive of prints where artists and scientists collaborate.

The 2018 edition will work in the same format as the first two iterations. 12 printmakers will be selected from an applicant pool. Those 12 will then each find a collaborator to work with, they will collaborate and build ideas together with an end result of 26 prints in an edition.

R&D editions will gather the editions, collate, place in portfolios and then send back two portfolios to each collaborative duo, so that each participant, not just the printmaker, will receive a copy of the works created.

Two of the portfolios will be held in R&D editions archives and build on the collection of art and science collaboration that R&D strives for. One of these portfolios will be used for exhibitions in to be determined locations. The previous portfolios have been shown at multiple locations, including at Frogmans’ Print Workshop, formerly at the University of South Dakota.

Here is a link to the official Intersecting Methods 2018 Submission Flyer with application and deadline information.

Email rndeditions@gmail.com for any questions or to apply for participation.